Monica's Battle

  • Oct. 22, 2018
  • #9516

Angels and demons watch us to see how we handle trials. Do we fall into depression, or do we decide to trust in Jesus Christ?

I’m sure you’ve heard, it’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Hi, I’m Joni Eareckson Tada and I’m pretty familiar with what it’s like to battle breast cancer, having survived stage III malignancy, a mastectomy, and a rigorous five months of chemotherapy. It wasn’t easy. And it’s why I have such huge respect for any woman who goes through the same. Like Monica.

I met Monica when I was speaking at a conference, and afterward, she shared with me her story. Monica was a single woman in her early 40’s. Her tumor had been detected late because she hadn’t gone in for regular examinations. Once the malignancy was discovered, though, she learned the cancer was a pretty advanced stage III. Monica was stunned at the news and felt she didn’t have a chance of survival.

She thought of the battle ahead, the surgery and the chemotherapy, the nausea and the changes in her routine. She thought of her work and the hours she would miss. She wondered about her insurance, and who would help her through the maze of appointments and trips to and from the hospital. How would she ever manage? It wasn’t long before she slumped into depression. Yes, Monica continued to go to church, and yes, a few Bible study friends said they would help, but this single woman felt so alone, so helpless. Monica would wake up in the morning, and struggle to get dressed, eat breakfast, and head out the door for her last few days of work before her scheduled surgery.

That’s when this precious woman heard me share my story about cancer on the radio. It was only a year or so after I completed treatment against my stage III cancer, and I was talking on the radio about a little booklet I composed from my journal notes, they were notes I had taken during my cancer battle. But what caught Monica’s ear on the radio that day was how I framed the battle. I shared from Ephesians Chapter 3 where we are told that the way we Christians react to trials actually teaches unseen angels and demons about God and His ability to sustain us. The way we respond to our problems shows whether or not we think God is worth it, because when there is a trial – especially big trials – we are suddenly elevated onto a higher battle ground where the mightiest forces in the universe converge in warfare. The cosmic stakes are incredibly high; because the whole angelic world is looking on to see whether or not we will trust the Lord. Those angelic beings, the demons, and everyone want to know if we will believe God, if we think He is worthy of our confidence. If we fail, if we give in and allow ourselves to doubt and become depressed, God ends up looking poorly, like we didn’t think He deserved our trust. But if we fight the good fight and persevere in the battle, then the wattage on God's glory goes so high, and He is shown to be the trustworthy God that He is.

Monica was shaken by these words; shaken out of depression and into action. Then and there, she decided:  “my goodness, I’m going to show that God is worth trusting, whether my cancer was stage III or IV or even worse.” Monica understands: cancer doesn’t win if you die; cancer only wins if you fail to trust Jesus Christ. Would you like to receive the same booklet I sent Monica that day she heard me on the radio? Then please go right now to joniradio.org and ask for my free booklet Diagnosed with Breast Cancer. It’s yours for the asking at joniradio.org. Or you may want to give it to someone you know who is battling cancer. I promise, the insights will help, just ask Monica. And once again, just to remind you, cancer doesn’t win if you die. It only wins if you fail to trust Jesus Christ.

© Joni and Friends

 

 

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